Art of War


The University of South Carolina has started scanning its rare collections and, wow, there are some mindblowing finds. Finds like this WWI sketchbook by Cpl. Douglas G. Ward, a British soldier with a brush and quite a wonderful sense of humor and history. It starts in '15 and takes us around the world through war until it's over in '18. (Also be sure to enter the vortex that is the South Carolina Digital Library. So incredible).



















An amazing update from a reader!: It is possible that the Irvin Department of Rare Books and Special Collections at the University of South Carolina would be willing to produce prints of some of these items. You can contact them through their webpage: http://library.sc.edu/spcoll/rarebook.html. Asking to speak, or leave a message for, Elizabeth Sudduth would probably get the quickest results. Thanks for the publicity, Hollister! I have worked for the Rare Books Dept., but am now an archivist for the South Caroliniana Library (http://library.sc.edu/socar/), which also has some great holdings.

10 comments

  1. Don says:

    Dear lord Hollister, these are incredible. Is it possible to buy these prints? I see about 10 I would like to frame.

  2. arnique says:

    I like the naval engagement print. It's so cute and begs the question, what happens next?

    Arianne from A + B in the Sea

  3. ADG says:

    SO COOL! And from my still fightin' the Civil War thang home state. USC also has Matt Bruccoli's F. Scott Fitzgerald collection. It rivals even Princeton's F.Scott cache.

  4. Ward appears for the first portion of his military career to be a member of 7th. Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment;
    http://www.1914-1918.net/sstaffs.htm
    As part of 33rd Brigade, 11th. (Northern) Division,
    http://www.1914-1918.net/11div.htm
    landing at Sulva Bay (Gallipoli) 7th August 1915.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Landing_at_Suvla_Bay.

    He appears to have been wounded on the Somme
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Somme

    On leaving hospital in 1916 he was transferred to a different unit and sent to India -- I can not pick up sufficient incidental information quickly to tell me which.

  5. The unit he was transferred to on leaving hospital would appear to be the '1st (Garrison) Battalion,' South Staffordshire Regiment, formed in Lichfield in January 1917 of men not fit for the front line and moved to India.

  6. Michael - your research is ridiculously amazing! ADG - I'm gonna dig up all the Fitzy stuff, too. How wild! Don - I think they're all stuck inside the USC collections! I want them all!

  7. Hanni says:

    amazing!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  8. Edward says:

    It is possible that the Irvin Department of Rare Books and Special Collections at the University of South Carolina would be willing to produce prints of some of these items. You can contact them through their webpage: http://library.sc.edu/spcoll/rarebook.html. Asking to speak, or leave a message for, Elizabeth Sudduth would probably get the quickest results. Thanks for the publicity, Hollister! I have worked for the Rare Books Dept., but am now an archivist for the South Caroliniana Library (http://library.sc.edu/socar/), which also has some great holdings.

  9. Edward - this is amazing news! I'm going to add this to the post itself. So cool! (And what a great job!)

  10. These are fascinating! But I'd be interested in someone contextualizing the "different types of turks" sketch-- doesn't it seem a little more disturbingly colonial and less frame-worthy or "cute"? And of course that's the one of the great things about a library-curated collection-- they can provide valuable information/history about their archives.